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Our Story

In 2009, my son had an incredible Grade 3 teacher—Jonathan. He was enthusiastic, smart and passionate about teaching. And fortunately for a mom who likes to get involved, he was open to new ideas.

As a freelance journalist, he let me come into my son’s class and for half an hour each week, to talk to the Grade 3s about what was going on in the news. And not just the light stuff. We talked about the G20 summit. And the environment. And, OK, every once in awhile Justin Bieber.

Before long, parents were telling us that their kid had explained the G20 to them. They were gobsmacked. But we weren’t—we knew that kids could understand the news if it was put in context for them. And more importantly, we knew that kids want to understand the news.

Joyce and Jon in the classroom with TKN. Image: Peter Bregg (http://peterbreggphotography.com/)

Joyce and Jon in the classroom with TKN. Image: Peter Bregg (http://peterbreggphotography.com/)

They want to know what’s going on—the real stuff, not just the fluff that the marketers are always pushing at them or the “news” that grown-ups “think” kids want.

After that school year, Jon said that he had a dream of creating a website so more kids could access the news in kid-friendly language. That’s how Teaching Kids News (TKN) came to be.

We are now in our fifth year producing daily, kid-friendly news articles. The articles are written by me and a small but incredibly dedicated group of professional writers, photographers and university-level journalism students who volunteer their time. We are incredibly grateful to them. Jon and Kathleen Tilly sculpt curriculum and grammar questions for every article and ensure that the site is understandable for kids, and that it’s relevant for teachers and homeschool parents.

Every day (except on holidays) we offer a new article, based on what’s actually happening in the world. Here are some recent articles:

  • The U.S. election;
  • A woman who bought a $34,000 painting for 10 bucks at Goodwill;
  • A wren that teaches its young a song while it’s still in the shell;
  • Malala Day; and
  • Caine’s Arcade.

Every story is in kid-friendly language and appropriate for kids in grades 2 to 8. Beyond just making the vocabulary accessible, we provide context for everything in each news story, so kids can understand what’s going on, and why. In the curriculum connections we encourage kids to think critically not only about the story itself, but about the way the story is presented. Does the journalist have a bias? What is it and how could the story be written differently by another journalist?

Now, fast-forward to this school year, 2014/15. Jonathan and I co-present the news each week to his class. I bring one or two articles from TKN into the classroom and talk about them, and then Jonathan assigns work based on that article.

We presented a story about Caine’s Arcade. Jonathan then had the class create their own cardboard arcade games. One of the kids in the class suggested they hold a charity arcade for the whole school. And that’s exactly what they did. It was a huge success. In just over two hours, the class raised $300 for the Foundation for Prader-Willi Research.

And that’s kind of the point of what we’re trying to do. Not only “teach kids the news,” but have them understand it, think critically about what they’re hearing, and then apply their knowledge to the real world. And then, maybe, go out and make a difference.

Who We Are

Jonathan TillyJonathan Tilly is an elementary school teacher with The Toronto District School Board. He has a B.A. in Philosophy from The University of King’s College and an M.A. in Child Study from The Institute of Child Study (OISE). Jonathan has been a speaker at conferences in Canada and the United States on the subjects of child development and psychology.

Joyce GrantJoyce Grant is a freelance journalist and editor, with a background in marketing and advertising. She produces the non-profit children’s literacy website Getting Kids Reading. In Jan. 2013 her first children’s picture book, Gabby, was published (Fitzhenry & Whiteside, illustrated by Jan Dolby). Her second book, Gabby: Drama Queen, comes out this Fall.
Visit Joyce’s author blog here. For a school visit, contact her at TKN@teachingkidsnews.com.

Kathleen Tilly is currently working in adult education, developing and presenting curriculum and training materials. Previously she was an elementary teacher with the Toronto District School Board. She has a B.A. in Art History from Dalhousie University, teaching qualifications from the University of Edinburgh and a M.Ed from OISE, U of T. In addition to teaching, Kathleen has led literacy workshops in the TDSB and across Ontario.

Thank you for using TKN. Please bookmark this site and visit it frequently to help you get – and keep – your kids reading!

Here’s an interview Joyce did with Matt Galloway of CBC’s Metro Morning in 2013, explaining why it’s important for children to have access to the news.